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The Quacks of Quedlinburg Two Player Review

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All board game reviews and ratings from “A Pair of Meeples” are entirely based on the game at two players. You can learn more about our rating system by clicking below.


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It’s time to become the potion master you’re destined to be, or just embrace the quack you truly are. The Quacks of Quedlinburg will have you constantly questioning the statistical likelihood of what just happened and wondering how in the world you drew all cherry bombs and exploded your potion!

The Quacks of Quedlinburg Review

8 out of 10
The Quacks of Quedlinburg Two Player Review

Is it Good For Two Players? : Pretty fun for two!

Quacks of Quedlinburg is quite good for two players. Since there is very little player interaction in this game, it doesn’t really matter how many you play with, at least in terms of gameplay. The game might feel a little less chaotic, and random statistical anomalies might occur less frequently, but if you play with the right person, you should still have plenty of fun with this one.

Theme: 8/10
Replayability: 7/10
Components: 7/10
Conflict: 0/10
Fun: 8/10

Husband's Rating
8 out of 10
Wife's Rating
8 out of 10

Pros

Unique bag-building push-your-luck game mechanism

A truly fun game

Lots of replayability

Simultaneous gameplay makes sure the game is quick, fast, and fun

Cons

Minimal strategy. Sometimes it feels more like a fun betting activity as opposed to a game

Gameplay Experience:


Quacks of Quedlinburg finally made its way onto our shelves, and it was a game we had been eyeing for quite some time. We already had Cubitos(Cubitos Board Game Review), so we were unsure if we needed another push-your-luck bag-building style game in our collection. But if you’ve been reading our reviews for a while, you know I can’t resist a good deal, so here we are!

Quacks looked quite daunting when we opened the box, with so many tokens to punch out and those crazy-looking cauldron boards. However, it didn’t take too long to understand how to play. Quacks of Quedlinburg starts off a little slow as players begin with just a few basic ingredients, but the tension of potentially having your potion explode is present from the very start. The rewards, bonuses, and payoffs of pushing your luck don’t seem very exciting or enticing in the first round.

We already questioned whether we really needed Quacks of Quedlinburg on our shelves when we already had Cubitos, which at that point seemed like the more exciting and better game featuring very similar mechanisms.

Soon, though, we started to see what all the fuss was about. As rounds progressed and we added more and stronger ingredients to our bags, the stakes got higher and higher. Even though the number of potentially dangerous cherry bombs stayed mostly the same throughout the game, the tension felt much more dramatic and exciting.

This is because as your ingredients grow, you fill up your cauldron much more before the risk of exploding starts to be significant. This means you have much more to lose if you decide to push it and draw a few more ingredients to try and outbrew your opponent that round.

Just because it’s more likely that you will be able to go longer without having your potion explode due to having more ingredients doesn’t mean that’s always the case, as we also realized quickly in one of the later rounds of our first game.

As usual, I was quite behind in terms of score, but as I was drawing my ingredients, I thought I heard muttering and potentially cursing coming from across the table. I glanced at my wife’s board and saw cherry bomb after cherry bomb in her cauldron. I continued drawing ingredients but crossed my fingers for the impossible to happen.

Clearly, I do have some sort of magical abilities because the statistically improbable did happen. My wife counted her cherry bombs, with a sum of six. She looked at me and said there was no possible way she could draw another one as she felt her full ingredient bag with probably 20 non-cherry bomb ingredients in it. She decided to go for it, and out came… another cherry bomb.

The obscenities came flying out of her mouth as I continued drawing ingredient after ingredient, taking my good old time filling my cauldron board to the brim with points. I stopped just shy of exploding and had my best round of the game, while my wife had her statistically unlikely and worst round.

The tides were turning, and I may have a chance of coming back from my embarrassing score. When all was said and done, though, it wasn’t enough. It did make the game much closer, though, moving me from 20 points behind to a mere 3.

This first game of Quacks of Quedlinburg showed us everything that was great about it. It was pure push-your-luck fun and deserving of a space on our shelf.

Quacks of Quedlinburg Rules Summary:

Quacks of Quedlinburg is a bag-building push-your-luck style game that may look rather complicated at first, but is actually quite simple and easy to play once you know how. The game takes place over 9 rounds, and players will be trying to collect more ingredients and brew better potions each round.

Players start with their own cauldron board and a few basic ingredients. The ingredients are represented by different colored tokens that range in values from 1-4. Some ingredients provide players with immediate benefits when drawn, while others do so at the end of a round.

The Quacks of Quedlinburg Potion Ingredients

The most important ingredients, however, are the cherry bombs (white tokens), as they can cause a player’s potion to explode. If a player draws cherry bombs with a sum greater than 7, their potion will explode, and that player will suffer the consequences.

The Quacks of Quedlinburg Potion Books
There are various potion books that change up the benefits and rules for each ingredient.

Before each round, the starting player will draw a fortune card that will either add a new rule for that specific round or give a particular player a bonus.

The Quacks of Quedlinburg Fortune Teller Cards
Fortune Teller cards are drawn at the beginning of each player’s turn and change up the rules a little each round.

Each round, players will draw from their bag of ingredients and add them to their cauldron, gaining any benefits they provide. The value on the ingredient token determines how far the player places that ingredient on their cauldron ingredient board. This means a 1-value ingredient is placed one space ahead, a two-value ingredient is placed two spaces ahead, and so on.

Players can continue to push their luck as long as they wish and keep drawing ingredients from their bags, but need to pay attention to how many white ingredients are in their potion to know when to stop and avoid blowing up. How far along the cauldron track a player gets each round determines how many victory points, bonuses, and coins they get.

The Quacks of Quedlinburg Cauldron Filled

Players will have to balance getting as many ingredients as possible in their cauldrons and avoiding explosions. If a player’s potion does explode, all is not lost. They will just have to choose between the victory points or coins they have earned; they do not get both.

Throughout the game, players will also earn rubies, which can be used to move their starting space in their cauldron up. Players who fall behind the lead player also have a “rat-token” available to them, which increases their cauldron starting spot temporarily for that round.

The Quacks of Quedlinburg score board

The last round of the game is played with players drawing ingredients at the same time to reduce any advantages a player might have in terms of knowing whether a previous player had their potion explode. In the last round, players can exchange their coins and rubies for victory points. The player with the highest score is the winner.

It is a game that seems more complicated than it really is, but most players will have it down pat before they even finish their first game.

Conclusion:


Quacks of Quedlinburg is a very unique game that fills a category void that many people have on their shelves. That void is the push-your-luck pure fun type of game that you can play with anybody, whether they are a gamer or not.

We thought we had already filled that gaming niche with Cubitos, but we have realized that there is probably space for both, as they are quite different. Quacks of Quedlinburg is less strategic than Cubitos in our opinion, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

Quacks of Quedlinburg really comes down to luck, plain and simple. You can select the perfect combination of ingredients and use your rubies as effectively as possible, but it doesn’t change the fact that you can potentially draw 5 cherry bombs in a row right at the beginning of your turn. You can try to mitigate it all you want by buying as many ingredients as possible, but it doesn’t change the fact it can still happen.

Some people might dislike how luck-dependent a game like this is, but that is what makes it so much fun. More importantly, it’s what makes it enjoyable for a very wide variety of players. It doesn’t matter how experienced you are at the game; somebody who has never played could beat you in their first game. This makes it a great game to play with new gamers because it’s very likely they will have a great time.

Quacks of Quedlinburg is the perfect complexity and length of game to pull out with anyone, as long as at least one person knows how to play since it is so easy to teach. The simultaneous gameplay feels even better due to no players having to wait for each other to draw ingredient by ingredient and instead can make progress while observing the intense betting around them if they wish.

Quacks of Quedlinburg might just be a betting activity impersonating a board game, but that doesn’t matter because it is delightfully fun, and as a result, we have no shame in playing something that is almost entirely up to luck.

Is Quacks of Quedlinburg Good For 2 Players?


Quacks of Quedlinburg is quite good for two players. Since there is very little player interaction in this game, it doesn’t really matter how many you play with, at least in terms of gameplay. The game might feel a little less chaotic, and random statistical anomalies might occur less frequently, but if you play with the right person, you should still have plenty of fun with this one.

In other push-your-luck style games, playing with only two players can often result in a runaway leader problem, with one player feeling like they never had a chance the entire game. Quacks has a great catch-up mechanism in the form of rat-tail tokens that give the losing player a fighting chance of potentially catching up each round. This is really critical and what makes the game still work very well with only two players.

This catch-up mechanism is what potentially makes this game a much better push-your-luck option than Cubitos for two players. This is lacking in that game, and as a result, one player can stay significantly in the lead throughout the game, which is never a fun experience, whereas the losing player will always feel like they have a fighting chance in Quacks of Quedlinburg.

Overall, this game is quite good with two players, but playing with only two doesn’t provide any advantages over playing with more.

Pros:

  • Unique bag-building push-your-luck game mechanism.
  • A truly fun game. Deciding to push and get a few more ingredients even though you might have your potion explode creates great tension.
  • Lots of replayability due to interchangeable ingredient benefits and double-sided cauldron boards.
  • Simultaneous gameplay makes sure the game is quick, fast, and fun due to no player having to wait for another.

Cons:

  • Minimal strategy. Sometimes it feels more like a fun betting activity as opposed to a game. This is also, of course, what makes the game so fun, though, so we can’t hold it against the game too much.
The Quacks of Quedlinburg Double Sided Cauldrons

We hope this The Quacks of Quedlinburg two player game review has helped you and if you are interested in buying a copy you can click the orange “Buy on Amazon” button.

Our reviews are not paid reviews, but some games are given to us, we do not let this affect our opinions in any way. This post may contain affiliate links so we might receive compensation if you sign up for or purchase products linked to. As an Amazon Associate, we can earn from qualifying purchases. This helps cover our site’s costs and allows us to continue reviewing games.


CMYK The Quacks of Quedlinburg: Megabox - The Hit Game of Potions, Explosions, and Pushing Your Luck
CMYK The Quacks of Quedlinburg: Megabox - The Hit Game of Potions, Explosions, and Pushing Your Luck
CMYK The Quacks of Quedlinburg: Megabox - The Hit Game of Potions, Explosions, and Pushing Your Luck

The Quacks of Quedlinburg Mega Box

If this game sounds right up your alley and you're the type of person to go all in on a game (a personality trait that really meshes with a game like this that's all about pushing your luck) then the Mega Box edition might be what you are looking for. This edition includes both (and only) expansions for the game and is perfect for the completionist.


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