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Silver Card Game Review

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All board game reviews and ratings from “A Pair of Meeples” are entirely based on the game at two players. You can learn more about our rating system by clicking below.


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Silver is an interesting little filler game that has players trying to remember their cards while contemplating whether they are in the lead or not.

Silver Card Game Review

6.5 out of 10
Silver Two Player Review Block A Pair of Meeples

Is it Good For Two Players? : Good for two players so long as you don’t mind a little bit of memorization in your games.

Silver requires a lot of focus and concentration from all at the table, so while it’s a good game, we necessarily wouldn’t call it a fun one, at least not most of the time. You and your tablemates will often be sitting in silence during a round, trying your darndest to remember all the information you have seen, and then… Somebody might let one rip and 1 minute later after you’re all done laughing and fanning the air you’ll realize that almost everyone’s forgotten their cards and you’ll resume pure and utter concentration as you continue through the round.  Until somebody calls and then other players do their best to screw them over and all the talking that everyone held in throughout the round bursts forth… until the next round starts. Those are the moments that make Silver a worthwhile addition to some people’s collections but they are also the things that will make this game appeal to a small subset of people. 

Theme: 5/10
Replayability: 6/10
Components: 7/10
Conflict: 5/10
Fun: 4/10

Husband's Rating
6 out of 10
Wife's Rating
7 out of 10

Pros

Unique card game

Lots of expansions/standalone games that can add a lot of variety and replayability

Excellent insert that is designed to hold everything in the Silver universe.

Cons

Requires a lot of focus and concentration

One of the least sociable games we’ve probably played

Can be a bit hard to grasp at first and some of the rules are confusing without a little extra research, especially in two player games.

Gameplay Experience:

Silver caught our attention after realizing it was in the same realm as One Night Ultimate Werewolf in terms of theme.  That was a game we had a lot of fun with in our early days of getting into the hobby, but one that required a lot of players and the right type of people to truly be enjoyed.

So upon discovering Silver, a more “gamey” card game set in that universe that works for two players, we had to give it a try.  The fact that we were familiar with One Night Ultimate Werewolf might have thrown off our initial perceptions of Silver because the two feel nothing alike to play but yet it’s hard to not compare them.

Silver Card Game In Progress

Were One Night is fun, lighthearted, and a very social activity, Silver is the exact opposite, a game of pure focus.  No talking is allowed during a round of this unique card game unless you want to be shunned by all at the table.  In a way it’s similar to the night phase of One Night Werewolf but in a much more serious way with no cathartic release after it’s over.

This extreme attention from players in Silver is required because of its heavy reliance on memory.  Players will need to remember what cards they have looked at, where they are in front of them, and occasionally some information about their opponents’ cards.  This is a lot to remember in pure silence, let alone at a table with others.

While the gameplay is quite unique and works pretty well it’s hard not to feel unsure about the drastic difference between the popular party game and Silver.  If they didn’t share each other’s theme so strongly these comparisons wouldn’t even need to be made in the slightest, but they do and it’s difficult not to make these connections.

Polar opposites aside, Silver is well designed and quite good in terms of gameplay, but will appeal to a fairly specific set of players.  Memory can serve its place in board games, but for my wife and I, it’s definitely one of our least favorite aspects.  

My wife struggles to remember what movie we watched five minutes ago and I overthink things to the absolute extreme so there’s no way I’m going to remember which place my 9 card was in since I got distracted thinking about the three other moves I was considering.  Just because we struggle to mesh with memory focused games though doesn’t mean they’re not great for some people they are just not our jam.

You have to admit though, games that require memory arguably also require some of the highest degrees of concentration and this often results in a much more somber and less sociable game night for sure.  This was clearly evidenced when I tried to ask my wife a question and she held up a finger and gave me that deathly stare that told me to “shut up” without her actually being that mean.  

But…. one could argue that with the right people you could take that aspect to the extreme and make Silver one of the most chaotically fun and frustrating games in existence with everyone at the table saying random numbers out loud and distracting their opponents in attempts to really throw a wrench into everyone’s cognitive gears.

Sounds like a good time and an occasionally annoying one, but a good one nonetheless.  So while taking the negative aspects of this game to the extreme could potentially no longer make them negative, it becomes an almost entirely different beast, or should we say werewolf, and one that probably wouldn’t work too well with two players, or at least be a little two mean at that low player count.

Silver Rules Summary:

Silver has players trying to get the lowest scoring hand at the table.  They will have to keep track of their cards and order while exchanging, swapping, and discarding to get their hand lower and lower.  Cards have special abilities that will give them opportunities to improve their hand or mess with their opponents.

Silver Card Game Cards

Players are dealt 5 cards face down and they are allowed to secretly look at two. These cards are considered to be in a player’s village. Players then take turns performing one of three actions:

  • Draw from the draw pile and either exchange with one or multiple of their cards or discard it.
  • Draw from the discard pile and exchange it with one or multiple of their cards.
  • Call if they think they have the lowest value hand.

If a player exchanges cards from the draw pile the exchanged card will remain face down.  If a card is exchanged from the discard it will remain face up.  This is important because some cards provide players with benefits if they are face up in their village.

Face Up Card Powers Silver

A player can exchange one card for multiple of the same card in their village.  This means they could take a 1 from the draw pile and exchange it with two 8s in their village, making the number of cards in their village go down.  If a player forgets their cards though and attempts to exchange a non-matching set they will have to put the cards back into their village.

Some cards also provide players with a benefit when they are discarding from the draw pile right away, still allowing them to advance their progress even if they aren’t necessarily changing anything in their village.

Silver Other Card Powers

Once a player thinks they have the lowest hand, they can use their action to “call”.  Their opponents will get one more turn and then everybody will reveal their cards to see if their call was correct or not.  

If it was a correct call that player will score zero, if it was incorrect they will score the value of their village plus 10 extra points.  Every other player will score the value of their village.  If a player correctly calls they will also gain the amulet that can be used to protect a card in their village the next round.

The game is played over four rounds and the player with the lowest total score after those four rounds is considered the winner.

Conclusion:

Silver is a unique card game but we kind of wish it would have deviated a little bit more from the One Night Werewolf theme.  We know that’s a bit nitpicky of a way to start this conclusion off, but man they are just so drastically different and one will throw off your expectations of the other.

That aside though, Silver is a great filler game that’s pretty easy to get to the table.  It can be a bit hard to understand at first but it only takes a few games to get a handle on the game.  It does require a fair bit of memory though which can be a negative for many, including ourselves.  

This is only significant though because how well you do really does depend on how well you can remember things with no catchup mechanisms for those who struggle with such tasks.  So if you hate memorizing things, struggle to remember your own phone number, or your gaming partners do this might be a game to pass on.

If you don’t fit that description though, Silver requires a lot of focus and concentration from all at the table so while it’s a good game, we necessarily wouldn’t call it a fun one, at least not most of the time.  You and your tablemates will often be sitting in silence during a round, trying your darndest to remember all the information you have seen, and then…

Somebody might let one rip and 1 minute later after you’re all done laughing and fanning the air you’ll realize that almost everyone’s forgotten their cards and you’ll resume pure and utter concentration as you continue through the round.  Until somebody calls and then other players do their best to screw them over and all the talking that everyone held in throughout the round bursts forth… until the next round starts. 

Those are the moments that make Silver a worthwhile addition to some people’s collections but they are also the things that will make this game appeal to a small subset of people. 

Is Silver Good For 2 Players?

Silver is good for two players so long as you don’t mind a little bit of memorization in your games.  Those who can’t remember what they ate for breakfast or those who overthink like my wife and I will be a little less likely to enjoy this game.

Now if the thought of remembering card numbers and order doesn’t frighten you away, then Silver plays quite well with two but is a much different game than with more players.  The lower player count greatly reduces the chaos allowing players to have more control of what’s going on in the game while also making it a bit easier to hold onto information since there is a little bit less of it.

And with the more direct game between two, your options may seem more limited, but at the same time, they are usually more strategic.  You can keep track of your opponent’s progress a bit better and maybe even remember where and what some of their cards are without causing you to forget your own. 

Now, there are some problems with Silver that become more of a problem at this player count.  The way scoring works, where if a player calls they score an extra 10 points can cause a big runaway leader problem.

In a two player game, the chances of this call error are even greater because your opponent gets another turn, and you’re their only target, which means they’re going to try their hardest to either get lower than you or give you a high card, which seems unlikely but time after time when I call, my wife somehow draws a witch and magically swaps my lowest card with a crazy high card.  

This can produce some funny moments, (only at the end of the game though, because remember there’s no talking during a round) but if you’re somebody who gets easily frustrated with these runaway leader type problems Silver might not be the game for you.  In our opinion, it’s not as big of an issue with this game due to its shorter playtime, but still something to consider.

In a two player game, the first player gets a pretty big advantage too, and since they can continue going first they can keep that advantage for the whole game.  This advantage comes from the option to draw from the discard pile right away that may contain a card that has a strong face up ability.  Of course, this is up to the luck of the draw, but can really sway the outcome of a round when there are only two of you playing.

Other than those things though Silver works quite well with two players and if you don’t find memorizing things a living nightmare it’s a great filler card game that is unique, but don’t expect a very sociable game night from it.  I guess you could say it’s a great game for those nights where you want your gaming partner to stop talking but you still want to play a game with them.

Pros:

  • Unique card game, that sort of reminds us of the classic, Golf
  • Lots of expansions/standalone games that can add a lot of variety and replayability
  • Excellent insert that is designed to hold everything in the Silver universe.
Silver Insert

Cons:

  • Requires a lot of focus and concentration
  • One of the least sociable games we’ve probably played
  • Can be a bit hard to grasp at first and some of the rules are confusing without a little extra research, especially in two player games.

Silver, Fun, Competitive, and Strategic Card Game, Fun for Family Game Night
Silver, Fun, Competitive, and Strategic Card Game, Fun for Family Game Night
Silver, Fun, Competitive, and Strategic Card Game, Fun for Family Game Night

We hope this Silver Card Game two player review has helped you.

Our reviews are not paid reviews, but some games are given to us, we do not let this affect our opinions in any way. This post may contain affiliate links so we might receive compensation if you sign up for or purchase products linked to. As an Amazon Associate, we can earn from qualifying purchases. This helps cover our site's costs and allows us to continue reviewing games.


Silver Versions/Expansions

There are actually three other standalone/expansion versions of Silver, but Silver is considered the core essential version with the others adding more complex cards and variety to the game. You can mix and match all of them together or play them on their own.

Silver Bullet

Silver Bullet is the 2nd deck in the Silver series - each game with all unique characters & abilities.

Deck Theme: Take That

Silver Coin

Silver Coin presents the power of card flipping. Fourteen new roles and abilities provide amazing new combinations

Deck Theme: Card Flipping

Silver Dagger

In Silver Dagger, you will find 14 new roles & abilities as well as a shiny dagger token.

Deck Theme: Turn Order Effects


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