Skip to content

Pyramido Board Game Review

Important Note:

All board game reviews and ratings from “A Pair of Meeples” are entirely based on the game at two players. You can learn more about our rating system by clicking below.


This post may contain affiliate links so we might receive compensation if you sign up for or purchase products linked to below. As an Amazon Associate, we can earn from qualifying purchases.

Pyramido has players stacking tiles to create a pyramid and at first glance seems like a neat little game, but some might find there’s nothing magical or exciting within those tombs. 

Pyramido Review

6.5 out of 10
Pyramido Two Player Board Game Review

Is it Good For Two Players? : Probably the best player count

Pyramido on its 3d surface looks like a cool little tile laying board game, but unfortunately, there really isn’t that much hiding within. What makes this game a bore for some are exactly the things that will make it great for others though.  

How easy this one was to learn is extremely impressive and perfect for those new to modern board games.  It has the perfect length, amount of rules, and complexity, making it a great game to pull out and get right down to playing especially if you’re limited in terms of free time.

So, while Pyramido is pretty good in terms of gameplay and design, for many it will likely get stale after a few plays.  There are better games in our opinion that fill a similar spot in your collection and have more replayability, such as Kingdomino.

Theme: 7/10
Replayability: 3/10
Components: 7/10
Conflict: 3/10
Fun: 4/10

Husband’s Rating
6 out of 10
Wife’s Rating
7 out of 10

Pros

One of the easiest games to learn, play, and more importantly remember how to play

Quick to play

Provides a neat simple 3d puzzle to think about

Great components

Fairly strategic due to multi-round planning

Cons

Feels very much the same from game to game

Lacks any sort of variety

Actions often almost feel like a toss-up because scoring is so tight

Gameplay Experience:

Pyramido Board Game Review

Pyramido wasn’t on our radar but its similarity to one of our favorite games Kingdomino tempted us to give it a go.  

As usual, I got to reading the rule book to learn the game, but I was beginning to think the game was more complicated than I thought.  I reached the end of the rules before I knew it though and came to the realization the game was dead simple, the rule book was just over-explaining every little detail of the game, which turned out to not be such a bad thing.

The next day we punched out all the tiles and sat down to play, and when I said the game is dead simple to play that wasn’t an exaggeration.  I was able to teach my wife how to play, make our way through a full round, and calculate scores without referencing the rulebook even once.  

I honestly don’t know if there is another game in our collection that one readthrough of the rules has sufficed to that extent.

Pyramido is a neat little game but there’s no denying it has borrowed or shall we say built a lot upon the ever-popular Kingdomino.  Players take tiles arrange them in a square, and score based on the number of symbols in a set of matching tiles.  

Pyramido changes things up a little by having players stack tiles on top of previously laid ones during each successive round, shifting their layouts a little each time.  This creates a unique but fairly simple and straightforward 3D puzzle for players to think about.

After our first game, we both thought that this tile stacking aspect was pretty cool and refreshing for such a quick little game, but that’s all there was to differentiate this game from its competitors.  

We could already tell this game was going to feel the same from round to round.  There were no surprises or exciting new revelations awaiting in repeat plays.  With Pyramido you pretty much know what you’re getting every time.

After many more successive plays, that was very much confirmed.  Now that’s not necessarily a bad thing and this game will still be great for some people, but for us, Pyramido is just missing that little something that makes you want to keep coming back for more.

How to Play Pyramido Rules Summary:

In Pyramido players will take turns selecting tiles and placing them to construct their own pyramid.  They will need to group similar colors together to create larger scoring areas filled with more jewel symbols.

The game takes place over four rounds and in each round, the tiles a player lays will go on top of previously laid tiles.  In round one players will collect 10 tiles and arrange them into a 4 x 5 or 5 x 4 square.

Pyramido Round 1 Board

In round two they will collect 6 dominoes and arrange those in a 4 x 3 square centered on top of the tiles they place in round 1.  This will continue into rounds 3 and 4 with fewer tiles being placed each time.  In the final round players will only get to place one tile.

Pyramido round 4 board

Players will collect these tiles from the market (quarry) and replenish them as needed.  The picking and replacing of tiles is where most of the strategy for Pyramido comes into play.  You can try to refill the quarry with tiles you need or attempt to limit your opponent’s options.

Pyramido Market Quarry

Players each have 5 jewel tokens that they have to place if they can when laying tiles.  This will mark areas that will be scored at the end of the round. 

Pyramido Jewel Tokens

For example, if a player lays a red tile containing a jewel symbol and they still have a red jewel token, they must place that token on the tile.  This red tile and all connecting red tiles will then score for each red jewel symbol at the end of the round.

Players also have 3 resurfacing cards they can optionally use that let them change a portion of a tile to another color containing a jewel symbol.  This is a great tool to increase scores or to lay jewel tokens in one turn.  It is important to save this for later rounds though to increase your scoring opportunities when turns are more limited.

Pyramido Resurfacing Tile

Players also get to score their lowest-scoring section twice which can introduce some interesting decisions into the game.  Due to this, it can occasionally be better to only place one jewel token if possible to double score a large area as opposed to scoring an additional smaller area.

At the end of round 4, players will add up their total score over all rounds to determine who has built the best pyramid.

Conclusion:

Pyramido on its 3d surface looks like a cool little tile laying board game, but unfortunately, there really isn’t that much hiding within.  In other words, you won’t find booby traps, secret tunnels, or mummies within this game’s pyramids.

Pyramido Board Side View

While that sounds very harsh, it’s true.  What makes this game a bore for some are exactly the things that will make it great for others though.  

Pyramido is an excellently designed game.  From the market to the 3d tile laying to the scoring, everything works very well and is great in terms of gameplay.  It’s gameplay though that feels almost identical each and every play.

It’s missing that luck or randomness factor that makes each round exciting.  Of course, an increase in randomness can as a result increase the fiddliness or frustrating aspects of a game, but Pyramido really would have greatly benefited from just a little bit more of that unknown factor even if it did come at a cost.

Sure there’s the luck of the market, but you can typically work your way around a bad draw, almost to the point where it feels like most decisions are a toss-up.  What we mean by this is that scores and actions typically feel so comparable that on the surface it almost appears it doesn’t matter what you do.

We know that’s not the case really and your actions do affect your score, but that’s the only way to describe what it feels like to play Pyramido.

Now all these things that we ourselves consider areas of weakness for the game are what make Pyramido a pretty decent gateway game for those just getting into the hobby.  

How easy this one was to learn is extremely impressive and perfect for those less familiar with modern board games.  It has the perfect length, amount of rules, and complexity, making it a great game to pull out and get right down to playing especially if you’re limited in terms of free time.

All this is great and all but it’s still hard for us to recommend Pyramido even for beginner board gamers because Kingdomino, which is very similar, is still likely the better choice for most.  It is still a great gateway game but ups the luck and randomness just that little bit that makes each game feel at least a little different from the last.  

We’re very conflicted about withholding our recommendation for this one, as Pyramido definitely has the slight advantage in feeling much more gamey, strategic, and thinky in the traditional sense due to the layering of tiles but that single strength doesn’t overcome all the extras you get in Kingdomino, especially at two players.

So, while Pyramido is pretty good in terms of gameplay and design, for many it will likely get stale after a few plays.  There are better games in our opinion that fill a similar spot in your collection, such as Kingdomino. 

Is Pyramido Good For 2 Players?

Pyramido works well with two players.  The game plays pretty much the same at all player counts and since you mostly focus on your own pyramid most players won’t notice much of a difference playing with just two players.  

The tile market (quarry) is where the biggest difference is seen between player counts.  In a two player game, the market will be refreshing much less between players, allowing them to potentially plan better and also strategically replenish tiles in a way that weakens their opponent’s choices.  

As we said earlier players can usually work around a bad draw though, so it typically won’t matter too much.  It still provides for a slightly more strategic game at this lower player count though.  

Overall, Pyramido with two players accentuates most of the positive aspects of the game.  Games will be quicker with less downtime and both players will be able to plan and strategize more.

Pros:

  • One of the easiest games to learn, play, and more importantly remember how to play
  • Quick to play
  • Provides a neat simple 3d puzzle to think about
  • Great components
  • Fairly strategic due to multi-round planning

Cons:

  • Feels very much the same from game to game
  • Lacks any sort of variety
  • Actions often almost feel like a toss-up because scoring is so tight

Synapses Games: Pyramido - Tile & Worker Placement Game, Build Your Pyramid Brick by Brick, Family Game Night, for 2-4 Players, 45 Minute Play Time, Ages 8+
Synapses Games: Pyramido - Tile & Worker Placement Game, Build Your Pyramid Brick by Brick, Family Game Night, for 2-4 Players, 45 Minute Play Time, Ages 8+
Synapses Games: Pyramido - Tile & Worker Placement Game, Build Your Pyramid Brick by Brick, Family Game Night, for 2-4 Players, 45 Minute Play Time, Ages 8+

We hope this Pyramido two player review has helped you.

Our reviews are not paid reviews, but some games are given to us, we do not let this affect our opinions in any way. This post may contain affiliate links so we might receive compensation if you sign up for or purchase products linked to. As an Amazon Associate, we can earn from qualifying purchases. This helps cover our site's costs and allows us to continue reviewing games.


If you would like, you can help others by sharing this Pyramido board game review.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *